I have to admit that author's point might be my least favorite standard to teach.  😂I was so glad when I stumbled across this text, because it made author's point and reasons so clear!  Even for this teacher who hates teaching it.  😳The author's point is the viewpoint or position an author is taking on an issue.  Students have to be able to identify the author's point and describe how reasons support the specific points the author makes in a text.  (RI 2.8) In Her Right Foot, by Dave Eggers, the author is making a point on an overlooked part of the Statue of Liberty.  The author gives very clear reasons in this text that support the point he makes on the Statue of Liberty.  This is also a great text to incorporate for teaching U.S. symbols and landmarks.


How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

Author's point is not first introduced in second grade.  It is actually introduced in kindergarten and first grade, but I have found that students still need support with this standard in second grade.  In my lesson plans below, I have gradually released independence throughout the week in their daily questioning during the read aloud and the independent tasks.  We take sections of the book to find the author's point in that part of the book and the identify the reasons that support that specific point.

How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

I print the anchor chart below as a poster (directions included) and laminate to use throughout the week.  Each day, I use it to record the author's point in that section with a dry erase marker.  

How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

Each day, we do a mini-lesson, go over vocabulary with my provided instructional routine, read a portion of the text, and complete a task.  A great way to keep your students engaged during the mini-lesson and read aloud is to stop for lots of partner discussion.  I have students discuss with their partner each question that I ask.  This keeps all engaged and accountable.  It also enhances their speaking and listening skills.  (If you purchase the bundle, you will get my Google Slides TM that guide you through all of my lessons.)

How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

Students practice identifying author's point and reasons all throughout the week which lead up to a culminating task and comprehension assessment.  They complete the daily tasks below in their reading journals.
How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

The culminating task requires students to identify the author's point of the whole text and provide three reasons that support the point.  While you are doing your read aloud mini-lesson, be sure to have students discuss their thinking with their partner before going to complete the task independently.  I do provide questions that will offer support with this.

How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

As always, I include a mentor sentence that goes along with the story.  This is a great way to incorporate your language standards!

How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

Since so many are distance learning right now, I have created a digital version using Google Slides TM.  It's included in the November Bundle or you can purchase it separately.  These are just like the PowerPoint lessons I use in my classroom, but you can assign slides to your remote learners to complete the independent tasks each day.  Just create another copy for each day of the week and delete the slides you don't want students to have.  You can display the slides from the original copy during your live or recorded lessons.  It will keep you on track and ensure you cover all components of the lesson.  Here are the components included for each lesson!  There are five days of lessons that include an agenda, learning target, success criteria, learning video and posters, vocabulary cards with tasks, read aloud, daily questions, daily tasks, exit ticket, wrap up, and self assessments for each of the five days!  These are a lifesaver!

How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.

How to teach author's point and reasons, including author's point and reasons anchor chart and author's point and reasons graphic organizers.


I have tried to upload these to my store in all the versions to fit everyone's unique needs this year.  I hope these help!  If there is anything I can do to support you, please let me know!  I appreciate you all so much!


















 

 Asking questions is an important comprehension strategy for readers.  Asking authentic questions encourages curiosity and engages the reader in the text.  Students are more likely to be actively involved with the text when they are on the hunt for answers to their questions.  It gives them a purpose for reading and promotes comprehension of that text.  You want to begin teaching this strategy through an interactive read aloud in which you model and scaffold the strategy of asking questions.  I use the text What Can a Citizen Do? to teach students how to ask questions before, during, and after reading an informational text.

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

You should begin the unit by discussing what questions are.  Creating a question can be difficult at first, so you will want to model for the students.  I would begin by showing them photographs of citizens helping in their community.  Ask students what they wonder about the photos.  Jot down their questions on a whiteboard or an anchor chart.  Point out to them the question words they used to begin their questions.  


asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

You can then transition to the mentor text for the week, What Can a Citizen Do?  Explain to students that good readers ask questions before they read a book.  Point out the cover and various illustrations throughout the book.  You can record their questions on your anchor chart.  I also have students record at least one question in their journal.  

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

As we transition into reading the text, I strategically stop at various points in the book to model think alouds and create my own questions about what I am reading.  Students will do the same.  They keep their journals in their laps to record their own wonderings.  At the end, they record any last questions they still have.  We then discuss how to find the answers to our questions and the fact that sometimes our questions go unanswered.  We then have to look at other texts or resources to find those answers.

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

As we go throughout the unit, we discuss different types of questions.  We also discuss strategies for answering questions, such as searching for text evidence like reading detectives.  I also teach students that sometimes we have to make inferences when answering questions.  I like to hang the posters below for student reference.

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

Each daily task in response to reading leads up to this culminating task of answering questions.  I have paired an additional text from www.getepic.com in which students make this sun craft and write things that a citizen does from the text.  In the mentor text, the author says that a citizen can bring in light to others, so I thought rays of sunshine was a perfect depiction of this!

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

I have created lesson plans for you that contains a mini-lesson for each day, text dependent questions, a daily task, and an exit ticket.  You can simply print and teach!

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

To ensure that I am super prepared for the read aloud, I print the questions that I plan to ask on sticky notes.  These have helped me so much!

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

Students will practice asking and answering questions on their own printables that we glue into our journals.  Each day we focus on a different component of asking and answering questions in informational text.

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

I always include a mentor sentence to incorporate into your interactive read aloud.  I love this sentence from the book!  You can have some big discussions on this topic and even create more questions to go along with that idea!

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

Since so many are distance learning right now, I have created a digital version using Google Slides TM.  It's included in the November Bundle or you can purchase it separately.  These are very similar to the PowerPoint lessons I use in my classroom, but you can assign slides to your remote learners to complete the independent tasks each day.  Just create another copy for each day of the week and delete the slides you don't want students to have.  You can display the slides from the original copy during your live or recorded lessons.  It will keep you on track and ensure you cover all components of the lesson.  Here are the components included for each lesson!  There are five days of lessons that include an agenda, learning target, success criteria, learning video and posters, vocabulary cards with tasks, read aloud, daily questions, daily tasks, exit ticket, wrap up, and self assessments for each of the five days!  These are a lifesaver!


asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

asking and answering questions anchor chart, asking and answering questions activities

This is such a wonderful book!  It's a topic that so many can learn from.  It also generates some great questions and conversations from students.  :)






 Grace for President is the perfect text for younger elementary students to teach about how our presidential election and the electoral college works.  I knew this would be a great fit for my November Interactive Read Aloud Lessons.  It's the first text that we will read during November.  I used this book to teach using information gained from illustrations and words in a print to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot in fiction texts (RL 2.8).  I also paired a nonfiction text from www.getepic.com to teach identifying and explaining how illustrations and words contribute to and clarify a text (RI 2.7).  In this post, I will share some Grace for President activities for in-person and distance learning students.

I would begin the unit by teaching the students the difference between words and illustrations.  I use these posters to show the difference and we discuss what we can learn from both.


grace for president read aloud grace for president activities

grace for president read aloud grace for president activities

The mentor text for this unit is Grace for President for the first three days of the unit.  Each day, I do a mini lesson about using the words and illustrations to help us better understand the characters, setting, and plot.  We use each day to focus on a different story element and compare and contrast the information from the words and illustrations.  This is a great text for that, because you gain different information from the illustrations than you do the words.  All of the mini-lessons and text dependent questions for each day are planned out for you below.

grace for president read aloud grace for president activities


grace for president read aloud grace for president activities

grace for president read aloud grace for president activities

As we are reading each text, I like to jot down key details from the text on these anchor charts.  You can focus on a different story element each day.  With informational text, I focus on a topic within the text.  What is the main topic of this section?  What can we learn from the words?  What can we learn from the illustrations or photographs?

grace for president read aloud grace for president activities

After the read aloud part of the lesson, I always have students respond to the text.  These daily independent tasks are standards-based and great for practice that leads up to a culminating task.  In addition to the culminating task, students will also take a comprehension assessment on Friday over the main text, Grace for President that is also related to the focus standard.  

grace for president read aloud grace for president activities

Since there are two texts, there will be two culminating tasks for students to demonstrate mastery.  On Wednesday, students will summarize Grace for President using this graphic organizer.  They have to use information from the words and illustrations to summarize the story, which demonstrates application of the skill.  I use this as a grade, as well as the comprehension assessment.  That gives me two grades that week on that standard.

grace for president read aloud grace for president activities

 For the informational text, students are given two topics or content words from the book.  They have to describe how the photographs and the words helped clarify their meaning.  I would give those topics to the students and display those pages for students to see during that task.  

grace for president read aloud grace for president activities

In addition to the comprehension tasks, we also include a mentor sentence to tie our language standards into our interactive read aloud.  I include a teacher version and a students version in which they have to cut and paste their sentence together.  We work on this all throughout the week.  You can also incorporate your language standards into their writing when responding to the text.

Since so many are distance learning right now, I have created a digital version using Google Slides TM.  It's included in the November Bundle or you can purchase it separately.  These are very similar to the PowerPoint lessons I use in my classroom, but you can assign slides to your remote learners to complete the independent tasks each day.  Just create another copy for each day of the week and delete the slides you don't want students to have.  You can display the slides from the original copy during your live or recorded lessons.  It will keep you on track and ensure you cover all components of the lesson.  Here are a few of the slides included!  There are five days of lessons that include an agenda, learning target, success criteria, learning video and posters, vocabulary cards with tasks, read aloud, daily questions, daily tasks, exit ticket, wrap up, and self assessments for each of the five days!  These are a lifesaver!

grace for president read aloud grace for president activities

grace for president read aloud grace for president activities

grace for president read aloud grace for president activities

grace for president read aloud grace for president activities

Thank you so much for stopping by!  Please let me know if there's anything I can help you with!



grace for president read aloud grace for president activities


















Identifying the author's main purpose for writing a text is an important component of reading comprehension.  When reading informational text, students should be able to determine if an author is writing to answer a question, describe a person or a specific topic, or explain how something works or how to do something.  This is a topic that you may want to spend more than one week on, since its a little difficult for students to grasp within one week.  It's very important to provide lots of scaffolding to aid students in remembering the different purposes in which an author might write a text.  In this post, I will share some activity ideas, anchor charts, posters, and printables to use in your author's purpose lessons.


Author's Purpose Activity Packet (Answer, Describe, or Explain


Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.


Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

Anchor charts are vital in your instruction for scaffolding purposes.  I printed these two as posters and laminated to use throughout my unit.  The first can be used when reading a text or to sort different books in your text set.  The second is a checklist that is so helpful for students to go through when reading a text.   I always require students to provide text evidence to support their thinking to ensure that I know they understand the concept.

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

Posters are also helpful to help students remember what the three different main purposes are, as well as the questions they can ask themselves after reading a book.  I used the lemonADE acronym to help students eventually remember the three main purposes while reading independently.

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

A fun activity that I like to incorporate in my comprehension instruction is the CASE FILE.  Students love to play and pretend while learning, so they of course love pretending to be detectives!  This activity can be used in lots of ways.  You can use it in whole group, cooperative groups, or at a learning center.  Some teachers even have their own text detective centers which is super fun!  This is a great to do learning centers while social distancing, because they can do this individually at their seats.  

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

I put these covers on the front and back of envelopes and laminate them.  Inside the envelope I put a book or passage, along with the author's purpose checklists.  You can also throw in some detective badges and magnifying glasses to use as trackers.  They fill out the checklist after reading the text and turn in to you.  This is a great way to get students to discuss their thinking and is a great assessment for you.  

You could also use this on day one of your unit, and pretend it's a special delivery for your class.  Your read aloud for the day could be inside.  This would get students super excited about author's purpose!

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

If you receive Scholastic flyers, you can use these for a fun sorting activity.  If you don't have these, you could simply copy and paste some book cover images into a document and print for students to sort.  Based on the cover of the book, they have to determine what they think the author's main purpose for writing the text might be.  This will only work with informational texts, so be sure to explain that to students before the activity.

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

The great thing about the checklist is that you can also use it outside of the case file.  You can use it as an independent daily task, at a center, or as an assessment.

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

I always like to throw in a craft somewhere, so these little authors are fun to make and display.  They can either choose a book or you can do this with your read aloud for that day.  Students will write the author's purpose and how they know.  You may want to give them a sentence frame, such as, "The author's purpose of the book _________ is to ___________.  I know this because..."

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

I also like to incorporate some other printables that you can use as your daily task for your lesson.  The ones below require students to write the author's purpose and provide three different reasons from the text to support their thinking.

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

One of my favorite activities to incorporate is a book club!  You could do this whole group or in your small groups.  Students will take a story and determine the author's purpose and three different reasons to support their thinking.  Have them paste their writing onto a small paper lunch sack.  When everyone is ready, fill the bags with popcorn and split students into small groups.  Also provide groups with these nonfiction discussion cards to go through while having their book club.  You will want to assign one member of the group to read the questions.  They can also discuss their thinking on the author's main purpose.  This is a fun activity to build up to at the end of the unit!

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

Finally, at the end of each lesson, I always provide an exit ticket.  There are different ones in the resource so that you can switch it up each day.  You can print these or just have them do it on their whiteboards.  This gives you another assessment to help drive your instruction the following day.  In our lessons, we have to always include three forms of assessment for each standard taught.  

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

Thank you so much for reading about how I teach author's purpose in my classroom.  If you have any questions, please feel free to e-mail me or leave a question in my store.  You can click on any of the images from this post for the link to these resources shown here.  I hope you have a great and restful weekend!

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.

Author's purpose anchor chart, author's purpose activities, printables, and more!  Tips and tricks for teaching students to determine the author's main purpose for writing a text, including what an author want to answer, explain, or describe.