Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction

An early lesson you want to teach your students is the difference in books that tell stories and books that give information.  I have found that the best way to teach this is within context of different types of texts.  Let's read more about some resources that I have used to teach the differences in the two types, as well as meet our pesky friend, the BOOK BANDIT!

Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction

We begin the unit learning the text features of both types of texts by creating this anchor chart and using real text examples to discuss the differences between the two.  I print the anchor chart from the pack as a poster, along with the two mini posters, for students to reference throughout the unit.   I printed the sorting cards on cardstock and students helped me attach them to the anchor chart during our whole group discussion.

Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction

They then completed their own sort below.  This is great to glue into their reading journal for additional reference during the unit.

Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction

I have lots of activities that I use included within the pack, but you don't have to use them in the order laid out in this blog post.  ;)  The activity below is one I like to always do with a new reading skill.  My students become reading detectives during this cooperative group activity.  Each group gets an envelope with the following recording sheets and a text, which might be a book or a passage, inside.  They work with their group to decide if the book tells a story or gives information.  They have to prove their thinking by providing three pieces of evidence from the text.  After you do a few rotations of these throughout your unit, you can add it to a learning center for additional practice.

Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction

Throughout the unit, I kept two bins of books labeled books that tell stories and books that give information.  I referred to a few of them during the unit.  But at the end of the unit, I threw them all over the classroom for students to walk in and find the next morning with a letter from the Book Bandit!  He had came in and made a mess of our sorted books, so it was the students' challenge to sort them back into their proper bins.  They had to provide three pieces of evidence from the text to prove their thinking and they attached it to a craft of the Book Bandit that they had made.  This was such an engaging activity and a great assessment!

Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction

Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction


Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction

I have included lots of other resources in the pack to use during your lessons.  Throughout the unit, students pretended to be detectives, so they wore these little badges!
Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction

We used these interactive notebook pieces for different texts.

Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction

If you have Scholastic flyers, you can have students sort them in these flapbooks.  This is another great quick assessment!

Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction

We always finish our lessons with an exit ticket for me to quickly assess their understanding of the different features of these two types of texts.

Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction

After completing a unit, I love to give my students new bookmarks for them to use during independent reading just to remind them of the previous skill taught so that they can independently apply those skills during reading.

Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction

Click any of the pics in the blogpost to check this resource out!  As always, happy teaching and happy reading!

Differences Between Fiction and Nonfiction



homeschool at home learning

My students absolutely LOVE playing Classroom Management Games!  I have designed this game set for May and June to cover any behavior needs you need to cover.  You just choose the behavior focus before playing the game with your class.  These games target those behaviors while positively reinforcing students meeting your expectations.  Classroom games are played as a whole group and end with some sort of reward.  You can also play the games in teams, tables, or individually.  These games are also great if you are homeschooling.  You can use these as incentives to complete activities and assignments during your day.  I have included a list of mostly free prize ideas in the resource.

I print the games on cardstock and laminate them.  I use Velcro dots to attach the game pieces to the game boards. 

homeschool at home learning

This game requires students to earn all of the shark's teeth by the end of the day.  If you are working on transitions, and students exhibit a quick, quiet, and smooth transition, they earn a shark tooth.  I attach the pieces with velcro dots.  If it's not completed by the end of the day, they have to start over the following day.

homeschool at home learning

Fill the Cup requires students to earn pieces to fill the glass of lemonade by the end of the day.  If you are working on cleaning up, and students exhibit that behavior, they earn a piece.  I attach the pieces with velcro dots.  If it's not filled by the end of the day, they have to start over the following day.

homeschool at home learning

Tropical Tic Tac Toe is played like traditional Tic Tac Toe.  When students exhibit the positive behavior, the student gets to add an X to the game board.  When students do not meet expectations, the teacher gets to add an O to the game board.  The first with three in a row wins!

homeschool at home learning

Hearties Hunt can be played as class vs. teacher or you can play it by tables or teams.  When a table or students are being on task, for example, they get to move their game piece.  The first to the treasure wins!

homeschool at home learning
For Beach BUMP, just choose what behavior you want to focus on.  When students do not meet expectations, the teacher gets to add a game piece to the board.  When a student meets your expectations, that student gets to add a game piece to the board.  The first with four in a row wins!  Don't forget that you can bump each other off the board!  

homeschool at home learning

BEE on Task Challenge is a students vs. teacher behavior whole group behavior management tool.  Reward students for positive behaviors by giving the class side of the board a game piece.  For negative behaviors, the teacher side earns a game piece.  At the end of the day or class period, the class must exceed the teacher side for a reward! 

These games have made all the difference with my class!  But I have to say that in order for them to work, it's up to you, the teacher, to keep them going.  You do have to keep reminding them of the game and make it competitive.  Stay positive and be an encourager.  You will begin to see your students mirroring those same qualities.  

You can click any of the pics from the post to check out the resource.  I would love to hear how it goes in your classroom!  Please feel free to tag me on Instagram to share how they are going!  

You can also save by purchasing the Bundle for the Entire Year below!

homeschool at home learning

home school at home learning







reading comprehension at home learning

I have gathered all of the graphic organizers I created for second grade literature and informational text standards together in one resource. These can be used with any fiction or nonfiction text and cover all the Tennessee and Common Core standards. Simply print these as a packet to send home with distance learning students or use these during your reading lesson with your in-person students. This is just a great way for students to continue practicing the comprehension strategies and skills they have already learned when reading a text.  

reading comprehension at home learning

As far as organization goes, I printed the covers of each section and attached them to file folders for each set.

reading comprehension at home learning

You can use these with books that you have or you can use them with online books, such as on Vooks, Epic, or Reading A-Z.  These are also great practice that you can put in an ELA center.  You could create a text detective center in which they complete a graphic organizer that goes along with a book they are independently reading.

reading comprehension at home learning

reading comprehension at home learning

reading comprehension at home learning

Click any of the images above to check out this super useful second grade resource!  I hope this helps with at home learning for your little readers, as well as the students in your classroom.  These graphic organizers are great not only for practice, but could be used as an assessment, as well.  Happy reading!



classroom management


If you are a teacher, you have been asked this a thousand times.  ;)  I used to get so upset with my students for asking this, because I had already told them multiple times where to put it.  But then I realized that maybe I needed to look in the mirror.  Usually, when there is a management issue in your classroom, there is a solution that can help alleviate that issue that comes straight from the teacher.  

I wasn't always being consistent with where I wanted students to turn in assignments.  I have a finished work basket where most work goes, but I don't always want it to go there.  Sometimes, I want them to hold onto it so that I can give them immediate feedback on an assignment.  Other times, I want them to bring it to me at teacher table to have it checked.  I also have a number collector who collects them in number order if it's something that I am using as an assessment grade for my gradebook.  No wonder my students couldn't keep up!

So, I decided to create a visual reminder to help them know where to put their completed assignments.  It took about a week to get used to, but they NEVER ask me what to do with their work anymore.  

classroom management

I printed each of the cards on cardstock and laminated them.  I added them to binder rings and hung them on my front board.  I always reference it before independent or partner practice, but if they forget where to put it, they just refer to the visual.  

I have included in the resource all of the cards that I use and in three different color options.  I have also included some blank editable cards for you to customize to your classroom.  I hope that if you are having the same question asked of you multiple times a day, this little tool will help you out!  Click any of the pics to check the resource out.  Thanks for stopping by!

classroom management
classroom management