making predictions

We, as teachers, are always stopping while reading to ask students what is going to happen next.  We want students to be able to stop and monitor their understanding of the text.  This will, in turn, help with their comprehension of the story.  I wanted to stop in today to share some new resources I am using in my classroom to help students with this strategy.

making predictions

I always like to start by introducing the strategy of the week with an anchor chart.  Did you know you can print poster-size anchor charts from Adobe??!!  This anchor chart is in my Making Predictions Pack, along with the directions on how to print posters from home or school.  I also print mini-anchor charts for my students to put in their reading journals.  We, together, create our anchor chart for the week.  I usually use a read aloud as an example to add to our anchor chart so that I can model using the strategy.  Students complete their own little anchor charts with me.  This, my friends, is such a powerful tool for my students to anchor their thinking and take ownership of our anchor charts.  :)

making predictions

I also have this little poster I hang as a reminder during read to self and partner for students.  

Students can be very apprehensive about making predictions.  We know that they do not want to guess the wrong prediction, so it's important to have that conversation with them that it's okay to not always be right.  We want them to feel comfortable using clues from the text to make their best predictions, along with their schema.  Sometimes it's fun to be surprised by the author!  I know that this book is perfect for encouraging students to make predictions in that safe environment.

making predictions

Enemy Pie by Derek Munson is a darling book that not only is perfect for practicing the strategy of making predictions, but it also teaches the importance of kindness.  I like to stop during the reading and ask students what they think is in Enemy Pie?  Do you think he's really going to give it to his enemy?  I have students record their prediction on top of the pie in the craft below.  You may want them to write their prediction with a pen, marker, or crayon, because they often want to change their prediction after finding out what actually happened. ;)  

making predictions

making predictions

After reading, they record what was actually in the pie underneath the flap.  It's such a cute story and fun little craft that your students will love!

making predictions

At the end of the lesson, I showed this Pixar clip of Ormie the Pig.  I stopped at 2:38 and asked students to predict whether or not Ormie was going to get the cookies this time.  I gave them the option of a picture or words. 
making predictions

They recorded their prediction on an exit ticket and placed it in the Prediction Pail.  I found this idea at Kindergarten Boom Boom.  It was just adorable and super fun!

making predictions

You can click the image below for this freebie label for you and your teammates.
making predictions

These are the exit tickets I used throughout the week.  I switched it up each day and we threw them in the prediction pail or clipped on our round up clips.

making predictions

making predictions

I also have students participate in a cooperative group activity.  If time is an issue for you, you could have them do this during small group instruction or even during centers.  It would also be a great early finisher activity students could easily grab and work on.

I create 3 or 4 case files like the one below and fill each with graphic organizers and a book or passage.  

Students read the book or passage inside and complete the graphic organizer together.  The first time I do this unit, I like to use all picture books.  When I do this unit again, I might vary it with other books and passages.  The great thing about my predictions pack is that you can use it over and over throughout the year.  There are too many activities to fit in one week.

I like to give them a page to stop at with a prediction question in the file.  It gives them a purpose and keeps them focused.  It's the "CASE" they have to solve!  After reading, they record what actually happened.  

making predictions

making predictions

I also use this graphic organizer all throughout the week.  I love to stick them in a Smart Pal to reuse again and again.  

making predictions

Another day, just to switch it up, we used this interactive notebook template to record predictions about If You Took a Mouse to the Movies by Laura Numeroff.

making predictions

The following day, we read If You Give a Pig a Pancake by Laura Numeroff focusing a little bit more on the clues students use from the text or illustrations to make predictions.

making predictions

making predictions

making predictions

These little mini-booklets are great to throw in a Read to Self tub for students to practice the strategy independently.

making predictions

And finally, my littles LOVE bookmarks!  Like, can't get enough!  These will help them remember to stop and predict while reading independently.  

making predictions

You can check out this unit by clicking the images below.  You can also check out my Interactive Anchor Charts below if you think that is something that might benefit you.  It makes it much easier for me to have my anchor charts ready to print and go each week.

making predictions 

making predictions


making predictions

Thanks for stopping by, friends!  Have a great break!

making predictions